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the president of the united states is on the ground in afghanistan. of course, we are in afghanistan because the attacks of 9/11 and now we know that president obama is meeting with afghanistan's president karzai, an unannounced and secret visit until this moment. some describe the relationship between our president and president karzai as "complicated." which could be the unstatement of the day. casey in point: a u.s. government released yesterday. new details of the level of corruption in afghanistan. and the unthinkable waste of billions upon billions of american tax dollars. officials in afghanistan are stealing american money according to the report. the afghan attorney general's office avoids prosecuting high profile corruption cases among other things. that's the situation as the president is on the ground if afghanistan our chief white house correspondent is at the white house. did you get any idea of this? and what do we expect to accomplish? >>reporter: the president's schedule was wide open all day leaving the possibility that he could have been going s
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
>>> 30 minutes from now the president of the united states will address the american people. >> welcome to cnn's breaking news coverage of president obama's surprise visit to afghanistan. the president will be telling us about the new strategic partnership agreement he has just signed with afghanistan's president outlining the relationship between the united states and afghanistan after the withdrawal of u.s. forces at the end of 2014. white house officials tell us the timing was driven by the negotiations over that agreement at an upcoming nato summit. critics will say it is about politics. everyone knows today is the anniversary of the raid in pakistan that killed osama bin laden. on the ground, do people there -- are they aware that president obama is on the ground? >> reporter: late in the afternoon the sun went down there was a report on afghan media suggesting that he was already in kabul. since then we have seen absolute silence across the city occasionally by helicopters and that is presumably some part of the president in and out of the capital. the speech we are ab
that the president has landed safely in afghanistan, he flu there year night from the the united states. obviously he is there on the one year anniversary of the raid across the border in pakistan that led to the death of osama bin laden. we also know the president will address the nation tonight in the 7:00 hour, 7:30 p.m., he will address the nation from afghanistan. and we know while there he is scheduled to meet with the afghan president, hamid karzai and the two ledder leaders ared to sign a extstrategic agreemen between the two countries. this would create an alliance between the two countries essentially saying about this the years going forward when the u.s. combat troops are out of afghanistan, there would still be training and cooperation between the two countries. that has been morimportant to t united states to have a footprint in afghanistan going forward and as the country marks one year since the death of osama bin laden, there are still big questions about the security situation in afghanistan. you were talking about occasional problems with the taliban. and this is separate from the
home, bagram being a hub or many troops returning back to the united states and i think keen to try to suggest as he said a year ago the tide of war is still receding, choosing this anniversary, the death of bin laden, the man for americans the reason why they came to afghanistan, choosing the anniversary of his death to take this narrative an extra stage forwards and explaining exactly how america will tie up the loose ends of the decades-long war and how his presence will look like in the years ahead. >> nick what is the strategic partnership agreement? it doesn't talk about funding. those say this is more about, this isn't really, some saying kind of sets out the logistics of what's going to happen over the next ten years, after 2014. >> it's very strong on symbolism, not heavy on substance. it's important for america that it was signed, that it happened because for months there were outstanding issues that made it look like it may never come to fruition. it's important it was signed ahead of this vital summit in chicago in may, where nato allies have to put forward their contrib
i'm anderson cooper. we welcome our viewers across the united states and around the globe to the special report, president obama addressing the american people from afghanistan, talking about the future of u.s. troops there and we are going to bring that to you live. >> lots of news happening now, dramatic developments covering the president's surprise visit to afghanistan like no one else can. we have our reporters in afghanistan, in pakistan, in washington, in new york, we're watching all of this unfold, our own john king will give us an inside look at what it's like to be on a secret presidential trip to a war zone. he's been on one before, our own erin burnett looks at al qaeda's future and our christiane amanpour and fareed zakariazaka. >> the president took a helicopter to kabul and signed a strategic partnership agreement with president hamid karzai. it could mark the beginning of the end of the war there. listen. >> neither americans nor the afghan people asked for this war, yet for a decade we've stood together to drive al qaeda from its camps to battle an insurge
relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the third time that president obama has made this trip. it's been over a year. the last time he was there was in december 2010 and furthermore, at the presidential palace which is where he is right now for brief remarks with president hamid karzai and to sign the strategic partnership agreement with afghanistan to talk about the u.s. relationship with afghanistan beyond 2014. that's extraordinary. the last time the president was in afghanistan in december of 2010 he could not make that trip from bagram air force base which is about 30 miles or so north of kabul to the palace because of weather concerns,
hamid karzai sits down for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fi
news. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> we're following the breaking news. dramatic developments. president obama's surprise trip to afghanistan exactly one year after the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden in neighboring pakistan. less than an hour or so ago we got the first word of his arr e arrival at the bagram air base. he is now in kabul meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai to sign a long-term strategic partnership agreement at a rather precarious time for relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the thi
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
actors are the only ones able to do something. does that mean the united states has to physically, that is in fact not the obvious policy implication of what i am setting. in fact, iraq should have told us our presence there in some ways created more problems than help. the presence in afghanistan might have created more problems than it help to solve. so i am not making an argument for some sort of boots on the ground u.s. must be physically involved in all of these places. >> there is another thing that we will forget at our peril. that is throughout the 1980's and 1990's, we saw salafi islam as an antidote. they're not going to be revolutionary. -- we thought they were not going to be revolutionary. we thought there were praying and wearing beards and so on. they have metastasized into this thing. even the whole creation of the taliban itself -- this was linked to regional rivalries. we have to look at the country. it cannot start -- [unintelligible] the other thing -- it is a pity mary laughed. you have to have a dialectic approach. in afghanistan, people turn to al qaeda as a
weekend, the united states faces military and diplomatic challenges. we will discuss stalled talks with iran and continuing tensions with pakistan, and the war in afghanistan. with one of the g.o.p.'s leading voices on foreign policy, senate john mccain. then, catholic institutions take the obama administration to court. over its insurance mandate on contraception. is it an issue of religious freedom? or women's health? we will ask a top church official pushing the legal challenge, cardinal wuerl archbishop of washington. plus, are president obama attacks on governor romney's business record working? and our power player of the week, a remarkable story of devotion to country and sacrifice you will not want to miss. all right now. on fox news sunday. and hello again on this memorial day weekend. from fox news in washington. as we remember those who is given their lives defending our country, we continue to face foreign policy challenges. here to tackle all of that is senator john mccain. welcome back to fox news sunday. >>guest: thank you for having me on especially memorial day. >>
guangcheng who the government now says can apply for a travel permit to go to the united states to study. before secretary of state, hillary clinton worked out this deal with the beijing government, mitt romney weighed in. here is what he said about the chen case. >> this is a dark day for freedom. and a day of shame for the obama administration. did governor romney overreact in the middle of the diplomatic crisis? >>guest: no, i don't think so. this crisis is a reminder of what we are dealing with in china. we hope there are reformers in the government pushing for a more open system but we know we are dealing with people that are paranoid and control freaks. and totalitarian system. they control everything from the words you can search on the internet to who visits this gentleman when he was in jail, i'm sorry, in the hospital. these are things that we are dealing with. second, there is a propensity thing has of unwillingness to force any assert america's values. tragically we saw that in 2009 during the green revolution in iran and we see that here now, in china, where somehow this adm
to sell -- trying to explain why the united states is going to be staying in afghanistan in one form or another for another, what is it now, 12 years. i mean, that is an amazing number when you think about it. a ten-year commit many here. now this is both on the economics front and on troops and all of that is still to be negotiated. every years, there will be a lobbying effort to convince congress to fund aid programs to afghanistan. we can only imagine what some of those political fights might look like over the next decade, plus two years. that said, this isn't going to be the easiest thing for the president to be explaining tonight. this is not spiking the football. i think at first when people heard rumor the president was going to afghanistan, is he simply having an ewith the troops on the day to mark the anniversary? no, he is trying to sell the what is not the most popular policy. you know what, we will be in afghanistan longer than folks want to be. but let me say why we will be there. i don't want to repeat 1989 when the u.s. abandoned afghanistan after helping beat the sov
of the united states refused to speak up on behalf of the demonstrators in the streets in tehran, and it has gone from one episode to another. we have over a year and now talking about possibly vetting some people. look, nearly 10,000 people have died this is a brutal regime of incredible proportions, and, by the way, if as sad fails in it would be the greatest blow to iran in the last 25 years because it would cut off the hezbollah, syria's most important client state, et cetera. but, look, horrible things are happening in syria and this administration has a feckless foreign policy which abandons american leadership. i know because i visit with these people, they are ready to help these people. they are already helping them some but it cries out for american leadership, and american leadership is not there. >>chris: there is a story on the front page of "new york times" that president obama is considering trying to get assad out diplomatically with the help of the russians. how likely is that? >>guest: again, he are here a year later, 10,000 killed and the main supplier of arms to assad, we
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
can win an academy award someday and the guy behind you can be a future president of the united states or even better than that the mayor of new york city the guy in front of you could be a future nobel laureate not to your right but certainly the one to your left. it's even worse than it looks in which they argue that washington partisanship has caused congress to become dysfunctional. we talked to the authors on wednesday washington journal. this is just under an hour. >> the gentleman that for a book are taking a look at congress it's even worse than that looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. joining us, the author norman and co-author resident scholar of the american enterprise institute thomas mann of the brookings institution where he served studies senior fellow. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. >> happy to be with you. >> the question is if it is worse than it looks, what exactly is worse? >> guest: we are now in a situation which we have a fundamental mismatch between our political parties which would become intensely polari
with the president of the united states. but a lot of americans as you know, and you look at american public opinion polls, they're concerned that they want the u.s. out of afghanistan, about 70% say it's time for the u.s. to come home, the u.s. is spending to keep 90,000 troops, $2 billion a week in afghanistan, $100 billion a year. why is this money well spent? >> we have already agreed on a process of transition to afghan authority whereby afghanistan will be looking after itself and after its security and the defense of the country almost entirely by 2014, and that's also the time that the american forces and other forces will withdraw from afghanistan. that transition and the eventual withdrawal in 2014 of the u.s. forces and other nato forces from afghanistan is good for afghanistan and good for our allied countries. today we discussed that. we have finalized plans. so 2014 will be a year in which the united states will not be spending as much money in afghanistan as it is spending today. it will save money and we will be providing security ourselves. >> but for another two and a half years un
station. he said three sthings, two of them were, it is very clear to the world that the united states has lost and that's why the united states as everyone knows, the united states is begging the taliban to come -- just sit down and negotiate with us. please. we know you've murdered thousands of americans. we get that. that's ok. just sit down with us. we'll keep releasing you murdering thugs if you just agree to sit down with us and talk. we'll even buy you a wonderful office in qatar so you will have international international prestige to spread whatever goodwill you wish to spread. that would be known, mr. speaker , the president would pay attention, that would be known as radical jihad. that is what they wish to spread. here's a news report today from foxnews.com from kabul, the u.s. has been secretly releasing captured taliban fighters from a detention center in afghanistan in a bid to strengthen its hand in peace talks with the insurgent group, the "washington post" reported monday. who in the world has ever studied history comes around and says we are releasing the murdering thugi
between china and the united states of how to resolve this so it did not flare up during the critical meetings that secretary clinton would be having in beijing. now we learned that chen has left the embassy voluntarily, is getting medical treatment here in beijing, and has been reunited with his family. andrew? >> stan, does the mere fact that xinhua is publicly reporting this, telling the chinese people what's been happening, does that suggest that chen himself could be out of danger from any sort of backlash from chinese authorities on his escape from the house arrest and that decision to go to the u.s. embassy? >> reporter: we're getting into areas of conjecture here, but you can read something from this statement. while there's been an information blackout on the chinese side, it hasn't been carried on state media, social media has been blocked. search terms connected with chen guangcheng have been blocked on the internet. while that's been happening, we've been reporting it freely on international media. as you're aware, often when we report things the chinese don't want getting
is the other part of the message, andrew. that is, this drawing the line with the united states and demanding the u.s. apologize to china for allowing one of its citizens, the chinese citizen to enter the embassy, and to give refuge to that citizen in the embassy, someone that china has considered in the past an enemy of the state. we need to put this in context and let you know about chen guangcheng, those who haven't been following this closely. he's a blind activist, a self-taught lawyer, someone who testified against forced abortions in china under the one child policy here. he spent four years in prison after organizing demonstrations, allegedly disrupting traffic and damaging property. after coming out of prison, he's been held the past 18 months under lock and key 24/7 house arrest. only in the last week or so did he manage to escape and get into beijing, touching off the events we've seen unfold in recent days, leading to the fact now that apparently he's out of the embassy getting treatment, reuniting with his family at a beijing medical facility. >> stan, thank you very much for tha
, it's vitaly important. this had political significance not just here in the united states but, also within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai, sign this agreement, show the afghan people that the united states is going to, you know, remain engaged in the region and, also send a compelling message to other neighbors who have metalled in afghan affairs but pakistan, you know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistanyou know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistan. >> thank you p.j. crawley forker assistant of state for public affairs. the president's announced trip comes four days before he officially kicks off his re-election campaign. here to discuss the strategic interest of the trip and, perhaps, a little bit of politics, too, is michael knott, the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obama administration now and then a prevention-off of public policy, form
and not a member of the united states marine corps. i wish i had one of those extinguished insurgencies because i walked out -- i missed part of the session because the taliban just issued two statements as this conference was going on. so this is very ongoing, i have to tell you, it's very much ongoing. including the taliban under the title of this symposium, war termination, how terrorists and radical group ends raise as couple of issues. first the taliban of al qaeda have never been designated themselves as a terrorist organization by any entity, although individuals within the organization have been designated of terrorists, the organization of the taliban has not been designated as such. secondly, because their affiliation in playing host to collide yaal qaeda, the talibane largest targest what we used to call the global war against terror. yet after a decade and a half, they have emerged i would even argue as a more stronger and more if not effective, more important political and military organization today. so the taliban currently neither a terrorist group nor coming to an end. however, t
a broad. it's a move that could end a diplomatic crisis with the united states. and final campaign rallies are underway in france ahead of sunday's presidential elections. opinion polls show that nicolas sarkozy and francois hollande as close as they've ever been. now i've been joined in the studio by rachel, bringing us the business news. one of the top stories you're looking at, rachel, is facebook and that initial public offering, i.p.o., what he wants the latest thinking on that? >> so this book is 8 years old, 900 million users worldwide, and thee decided now is the time to float on the markets. everybody's talking about t. the big question is will people want to invest in it? one of the things is the founder, mark zuckerberg. he's almost 60% control of boasting rights. as recently as last month, he agreed to buy the photo sharing site for a pillion dollars, and told the board about it afterwards. so earlier, i spoke to stewart mills and asked how he thinks mr. zuckerberg will answer to shareholders. >> when the board and shareholders start coming in and saying, look, we own this comp
combat troops. a lot of afghans have been concerned about how the united states will remain here. this agreement basically says that we commit ourselves to supporting afghanistan economically. you know, we'll support its development and we will retain a number of troops here in a counterterrorism role in the post-2014 environment. mostly to chase after what's left of al qaeda. but this is a... signifies sort of a long-term commitment of the united states to afghanistan and more broadly to the region. >> ifill: even in the negotiating of this agreement, there have been tensions. of course we have documented all the tensions in the u.s.-afghan relationship, specifically with president karzai. was any of that in evidence today? >> not really. i think president karzai got pretty much what he wanted for his own domestic audience, his contingency. let's not forget that we had these very controversial night raids that they wanted the afghans to take the lead on. we signed a memorandum of understanding with the afghan government on that. there was a detainee issue which was a big stickin
, look, the president is announcing tonight that the united states is going to have a commitment to afghanistan all the way to 2024. let's think about that for a minute. this war in afghanistan started after 9/11. so 23 years after 9/11, our commitment in afghanistan may formally, finally come to an end. as atia pointed out, this isn't just all about the troops, it's about resources. a few points about this agreement. number one, there is not going to be any permanent u.s. base. it not like enginegermany, not japan. any military force would be using the afghan facilities. that's number one. number two, the amount of money is not specified because that's up to congress, and congress will make that decision every year. what does that mean? there will be an annual lobbying effort. this is where i think the politics of this is not so cut and dry, and there may be a lot of people saying, this is an obama anniversary. it may be a way of doing that. but look how unpopular the war in afghanistan is. he's got to sit there and explain to the american people that while this is the beginning
. and the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones who promised to burn a copy of the quran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia movement that pushes to pass legislation at a state level to ban sharia law, islamic law. it starts in oklahoma where there's this huge muslim population. no, there's knotts a huge miss -- there's not a huge muslim population in oklahoma. it's ridiculous, and the whole movement is ridiculous since there have been no cases of sharia law actually being cited with one exception in new jersey which was then overturned. and, of course, you remember that summer as well as two years before all of the rumors that obama, our president, is muslim. one-third of all republicans believed this according to polling at the time. one-quarter of the entire electorate believes this. and, of course, the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes a political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, for it. newt gingrich, he's against i
right now. a short time later, just about half an hour ago, mr. obama spoke to the united states laying out his vision for ending america's longest war. saying afghanistan is where the war began and where it will end. here's a portion of his address. >> today i signed a historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. a future in which war ends and new chapter begins. ten years ago, the united states and our allies went to war to make sure that al qaeda could never again use this country to launch attacks against us. despite initial success, for a number of reasons, this war has taken longer than most anticipated. over the last three years, the tide has turned. we broke the taliban's momentum. we built strong afghan security forces. we devastated al qaeda's leadership, taking out over 20 of their leaders. one year ago, from the base here in afghanistan, our troops launched the
bin laden and had great concerns about plotting attacks in the west, including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard clarke were ringing alarm bells at the white house level. again, at that point, when we go back and look, it administration at that point was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999. >> putting out fires elsewhere in the national security arena. >> yes. >> you talk about this wave of al qaeda violence. then they get beaten back. sometimes because of their own actions. what caused the temporary defeat the first time? was a launch into afghanistan? >> actually, it is almost the reverse of what we just outlined. the host that they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown. in addition to that, we saw the u.s. approach that was focused mostly on clandestine services. the cia come in a range of other intelligence services in a geospatial way, and special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and in afghanistan and other locations. >> we are talking about in 2001 how the united states fought back by sending in
the united states will be involved in afghanistan after u.s. troops leave the country in 2014. >> i've come to afghanistan to mark a short moment for our two nations. to do so on afghan soil. i'm here to affirm the bonds between our countries, to thank american and afghans who have sacrificed so much over these last ten years and to look forward to a future of peace and security and greater prosperity for our nations. >> we can expect to hear more about in his president's address coming up shortly. he addressed u.s. forces at the air babes and waded in the crowd for hand shakes, thanked them for all the sacrifices they have made. he said he could not be more proud to be their chief. ed, we're getting dribbles from the white house what the president will say tonight. >> we got a preview from the president himself as soon as me landed in afghanistan, basically he made some quick remarks we're saying that we did not choose this war. it came to us on 9/11. he also said the battle is not over but this is the beginning of the end basically of america's longest war. we got a preview there and also
the best math scores. ...the united states would be on that list. in 25th place. let's raise academic standards across the nation. let's get back to the head of the class. let's solve this. >>> jack cafferty is here with "the cafferty file." jack? >> wolf, president obama's support for same-sex marriage is sure to fire up parts of the liberal base it could alienate other parts including black voters. in other words, backing gay marriage might be a risky proposition for the president in an election year when it comes to one of the core voting blocs. in 2008, you'll recall african-americans were crucial in making this president the first black president. 96% of black voters supported obama and they made up 13% of the electorate. fast forward four years approximately while polls suggest america on the whole is moving toward supporting same-sex marriage. nbc-washington post voting say 56 are opposed to it and this opposition from blacks could hurt the president especially in the south. just this week, north killer carol blacks voted two to one in favor of an amendment in that state bannin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 405 (some duplicates have been removed)

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